Broadcast Law Blog

Broadcast Law Blog

Tag Archives: march madness copyright

March Madness is A Trademarked Term Like the “Super Bowl” – Watch Your Advertising and Promotional Uses

Posted in Advertising Issues, Intellectual Property
We’ve written many times before about those big name events, like March Madness, the Olympics and the Super Bowl. Events that you and your advertisers are just dying to tie into your own local event – a sale, a party or maybe the introduction of some special new product or service. Well, like the Super Bowl, March Madness … Continue Reading

Is it Madness to Say “March Madness” On the Air? – The Trademark Issue

Posted in Intellectual Property
Like "Super Bowl," "Olympics" and "NASCAR," "March Madness" is also a term that is protected by trademark law, and its unauthorized use in commercials could result in legal liability.  But the development of March Madness is a bit more interesting, and you can probably thank Brent Musburger for that.  The Illinois High School Association (IHSA) has been using the term "March Madness" to … Continue Reading

Stephen Colbert Olympics Coverage Explains Trademark Law

Posted in Intellectual Property
Getting legal education from a fake news program is always dangerous, but a recent episode of the Stephen Colbert Show, here, nicely demonstrated trademark law.  The clip illustrates what we have written before, that the term "Olympics", like "Super Bowl" and "March Madness" are trademarked, and attempts to use them in commercials or promotions, or to otherwise imply … Continue Reading

Remember “Super Bowl”, the “Olympics” and “March Madness” Are Trademarked Terms – Don’t Use Them In Advertising Without Permission

Posted in Advertising Issues, Intellectual Property
With the Super Bowl and the Winter Olympics less than 2 weeks away, and March Madness not far behind, we once again need to remind our readers that all three are trademarked terms, meaning that their use, particularly for commercial purposes, is limited.  We’ve wrote here last year about the use of the term "Super Bowl" in commercials, … Continue Reading